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  • '''Acoustic energy''' is a property of a periodic pressure wave, or a single pulse, propagati Human beings can usually perceive acoustic energy between the frequenies of 20–20,000 Hz, which is the basis of hearing. Hu
    2 KB (342 words) - 06:05, 31 May 2009
  • ...hrough elastic media such as air or water. [[Hearing]] is the detection of acoustic energy within the frequency range of the animal detecting the energy
    226 bytes (33 words) - 13:25, 28 September 2008
  • 173 bytes (19 words) - 13:27, 28 September 2008

Page text matches

  • ...and a transducer (usually but not always different) converts the reflected acoustic energy into an electronic signal that can be processed and displayed.
    318 bytes (44 words) - 23:15, 19 March 2009
  • ...hrough elastic media such as air or water. [[Hearing]] is the detection of acoustic energy within the frequency range of the animal detecting the energy
    226 bytes (33 words) - 13:25, 28 September 2008
  • ...sonant cavities, such as [[laser]]s against windowpanes vibrating with the acoustic energy of conversations in a room; usually part of [[radiofrequency MASINT]]
    387 bytes (52 words) - 16:19, 1 March 2010
  • '''Acoustic energy''' is a property of a periodic pressure wave, or a single pulse, propagati Human beings can usually perceive acoustic energy between the frequenies of 20–20,000 Hz, which is the basis of hearing. Hu
    2 KB (342 words) - 06:05, 31 May 2009
  • [[Diagnostic imaging]] using [[acoustic energy]], usually above the human hearing range, although the instruments may prov
    204 bytes (25 words) - 22:00, 6 February 2009
  • ...[[U.S. Navy]]; carry small explosive charges used as additional sources of acoustic energy; devices intended for area search rather than localization
    251 bytes (34 words) - 02:53, 1 February 2011
  • ...achieve their effects by means of non-ionizing electromagnetic radiation, acoustic energy or possibly charged particle beams
    241 bytes (33 words) - 15:47, 5 September 2009
  • ...buoys. These carry small explosive charges used as additional sources of acoustic energy.
    2 KB (274 words) - 23:58, 31 January 2011
  • {{r|Acoustic energy}}
    241 bytes (29 words) - 22:31, 22 December 2008
  • {{r|Acoustic energy}}
    320 bytes (40 words) - 17:09, 11 June 2009
  • {{r|Acoustic energy}}
    314 bytes (44 words) - 21:16, 7 March 2011
  • {{r|Acoustic energy}}
    334 bytes (41 words) - 16:03, 8 March 2010
  • {{r|Acoustic energy}}
    362 bytes (44 words) - 12:21, 25 June 2012
  • Nonlethal [[acoustic energy]] and noncoherent [[visible light]] weapons are being deployed as nonlethal
    1 KB (174 words) - 08:30, 16 January 2011
  • {{r|Acoustic energy}}
    463 bytes (55 words) - 07:41, 16 April 2010
  • {{r|Acoustic energy}}
    846 bytes (96 words) - 21:57, 30 July 2009
  • {{r|Acoustic energy}}
    1 KB (154 words) - 11:06, 13 February 2011
  • ...the method known are covering the decks with rubberized tiles that absorb acoustic energy. The noisier parts of the propulsion system, such as reactor pumps and tur
    8 KB (1,162 words) - 08:56, 1 November 2010
  • {{r|Acoustic energy}}
    1 KB (203 words) - 20:10, 11 January 2010
  • The technique physically involves sending [[acoustic energy]] from a [[transducer]], far above the human hearing range (1.6 to 20 MHz),
    3 KB (487 words) - 18:48, 25 March 2010

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