Difference between revisions of "Integrity"

From Citizendium
Jump to navigation Jump to search
imported>Howard C. Berkowitz
imported>Howard C. Berkowitz
 
(One intermediate revision by the same user not shown)
Line 1: Line 1:
'''Integrity''' of information refers to the assurance that data retrieved from an information system has the same meaning as when it was entered. In U.S. law, it refers to the "Guarding against improper information modification or destruction, and includes ensuring information non-repudiation and authenticity."<ref>44 USC 3542</ref>
{{subpages}}
'''Integrity''', in [[information security]], refers to the assurance that data retrieved from an information system has the same meaning as when it was entered. In U.S. law, it refers to the "Guarding against improper information modification or destruction, and includes ensuring information non-repudiation and authenticity."<ref>44 USC 3542</ref>


Again, a simple definition is easy, but a detailed definition is hard.  
Two recognized subsets are:
*Atomic integrity, or the assurance that an individual record is unchanged
*Sequential integrity, or the assurance that records of a file are not duplicated, deleted, or out of sequence
 
'''Nonrepudiation''' is an aspect of the processing of information. Sender nonrepudiation means that one cannot deny creating a transaction, and can prove having done so, while receiver nonrepudiation means one cannot deny receiving it.


==References==
==References==
{{reflist}}
{{reflist}}

Latest revision as of 14:23, 30 September 2009

This article is developing and not approved.
Main Article
Discussion
Related Articles  [?]
Bibliography  [?]
External Links  [?]
Citable Version  [?]
 
This editable Main Article is under development and subject to a disclaimer.

Integrity, in information security, refers to the assurance that data retrieved from an information system has the same meaning as when it was entered. In U.S. law, it refers to the "Guarding against improper information modification or destruction, and includes ensuring information non-repudiation and authenticity."[1]

Two recognized subsets are:

  • Atomic integrity, or the assurance that an individual record is unchanged
  • Sequential integrity, or the assurance that records of a file are not duplicated, deleted, or out of sequence

Nonrepudiation is an aspect of the processing of information. Sender nonrepudiation means that one cannot deny creating a transaction, and can prove having done so, while receiver nonrepudiation means one cannot deny receiving it.

References

  1. 44 USC 3542