Difference between revisions of "Integrity"

From Citizendium
Jump to navigation Jump to search
imported>Howard C. Berkowitz
imported>Howard C. Berkowitz
Line 1: Line 1:
'''Integrity''' of information refers to the assurance that data retrieved from an information system has the same meaning as when it was entered. In U.S. law, it refers to the "Guarding against improper information modification or destruction, and includes ensuring information non-repudiation and authenticity."<ref>44 USC 3542</ref>
{{subpages{{
'''Integrity''', in [[information security]], refers to the assurance that data retrieved from an information system has the same meaning as when it was entered. In U.S. law, it refers to the "Guarding against improper information modification or destruction, and includes ensuring information non-repudiation and authenticity."<ref>44 USC 3542</ref>


Again, a simple definition is easy, but a detailed definition is hard.  
Again, a simple definition is easy, but a detailed definition is hard.  
Two recognized subsets are:
*Atomic integrity, or the assurance that an individual record is unchanged
*Sequential integrity, or the assurance that records of a file are not duplicated, deleted, or out of sequence


==References==
==References==
{{reflist}}
{{reflist}}

Revision as of 14:22, 30 September 2009

{{subpages{{ Integrity, in information security, refers to the assurance that data retrieved from an information system has the same meaning as when it was entered. In U.S. law, it refers to the "Guarding against improper information modification or destruction, and includes ensuring information non-repudiation and authenticity."[1]

Again, a simple definition is easy, but a detailed definition is hard.

Two recognized subsets are:

  • Atomic integrity, or the assurance that an individual record is unchanged
  • Sequential integrity, or the assurance that records of a file are not duplicated, deleted, or out of sequence

References

  1. 44 USC 3542