Difference between revisions of "Accelerometer"

From Citizendium
Jump to navigation Jump to search
imported>Howard C. Berkowitz
(New page: {{subpages}} In engineering, an '''accelerometer''' is a sensor for velocity and acceleration, usually stabilized or corrected to report on movement in one axis. At least three acceler...)
 
imported>Howard C. Berkowitz
 
Line 1: Line 1:
{{subpages}}
{{subpages}}
In [[engineering]], an '''accelerometer''' is a sensor for velocity and acceleration, usually stabilized or corrected to report on movement in one axis. At least three accelerometers, therefore, are necessary to give three-dimensional position, and more may be needed to provide corrections for movement of the platform on which the accelerometers are mounted.
In [[engineering]], an '''accelerometer''' is a sensor for [[velocity]] and [[acceleration]], usually stabilized or corrected to report on movement in one axis. At least three accelerometers, therefore, are necessary to give three-dimensional position, and more may be needed to provide corrections for movement of the platform on which the accelerometers are mounted.
 
The term is also used for an aircraft flight instrument that displays instantaneous acceleration along the axis of flight.


One basic accelerometer type is based on a [[strain gauge]], or sensor whose resistance increases with lengthening of resistive material by physical force, in this case of the acceleration.
One basic accelerometer type is based on a [[strain gauge]], or sensor whose resistance increases with lengthening of resistive material by physical force, in this case of the acceleration.

Latest revision as of 16:13, 22 June 2010

This article is developing and not approved.
Main Article
Discussion
Related Articles  [?]
Bibliography  [?]
External Links  [?]
Citable Version  [?]
 
This editable Main Article is under development and subject to a disclaimer.

In engineering, an accelerometer is a sensor for velocity and acceleration, usually stabilized or corrected to report on movement in one axis. At least three accelerometers, therefore, are necessary to give three-dimensional position, and more may be needed to provide corrections for movement of the platform on which the accelerometers are mounted.

The term is also used for an aircraft flight instrument that displays instantaneous acceleration along the axis of flight.

One basic accelerometer type is based on a strain gauge, or sensor whose resistance increases with lengthening of resistive material by physical force, in this case of the acceleration.